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"Your book gave me the incentive to keep pushing through, not only with my company but with life as well. Your speaking and seminars are some of the most influential that I have ever sat through and left me always wanting more." More..


Erin Yarbro, CMCA, AMS, PCAM
Community Association Manager, President
Intel Management of SC, LLC


CRAIG'S BLOG

Craig Huntington

Craig Huntington

Latest Entries

What Difference Will You Make?

Posted by Craig Huntington
Craig Huntington
Craig Huntington received his Bachelor of Science degree in business from Oregon
User is currently offline
on Monday, 06 August 2018
in Blog

I stopped by to pay my respects to her family. She had passed way too soon at 59. It was cancer, a killer that had found a foothold in her ovaries, then invaded everywhere else.

 

She was friend who had gone out of her way on more than one occasion to perform a selfless kindness for my family and me. And she did these niceties with no expectations. There was no anticipation of a reciprocal act of graciousness. She was generous and thoughtful because she could be.

 

She was the kind of person who had 17 best friends. She made everyone she met feel special and welcome and comfortable with her big, bright wonderful smile.

 

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Servant Leadership with Style

Posted by Craig Huntington
Craig Huntington
Craig Huntington received his Bachelor of Science degree in business from Oregon
User is currently offline
on Saturday, 21 July 2018
in Blog

 

“I believe a haircut can change someone’s life.”
– Jason Schneidman, LA Stylist

 

Thirteen years ago Jason Schneidman was battling a drug and alcohol addiction. Today, the stylist for A-list celebrities like Jimmy Fallon, Hugh Jackman and Bruno Mars, sees himself in the nearly 60,000 homeless people living on the streets of Los Angeles, and is doing his part to make a difference.

 

You see, while Schneidman spends most of his week dazzling his exclusive clientele with the latest styles, during his time off, he’s using his talent, creativity and showmanship, to serve the needy. He calls it “Street Cuts.” And he goes directly to the homeless population in Los Angeles with the objective of making a positive impact. Schneidman knows he can’t single-handedly fix the problem of people living on the streets, but he knows that he can make an impact.

 

Schneidman regularly calls on other stylists to bring the tools of their trade, along with personal hygiene products and food, to a specific street location. Then they spend hours giving trendy haircuts, warmth and encouragement to people who need it most. You can see a heartwarming video of Schneidman in action here.

 

As Schneidman says in the video produced by Insider, “So what I find in helping homeless people with haircuts is their appearance changes, and their attitude changes, and then also the people around them see these people differently.”

 

I’d love to meet Mr. Schneidman. He’s a wonderful example of a servant leader – someone who makes a powerful, productive impact by helping others become successful as they strive to meet a common goal.

 

Larry Spears, author and servant leadership ninja, identified six principles that define servant leadership:

 

Empathy: A servant leader strives to understand and share the feelings of each team member as well as those of his or her customers. Giving trusted coworkers the benefit of the doubt by assuming the good in them goes a long way toward instilling loyalty and trust in you from your team.

 

Awareness: Servant leaders have a strong awareness of what’s going on around them. They care deeply about the welfare of their team members and don’t view them as simply cogs in a machine.

 

Building Community: Creating an environment where all parties can thrive. This includes sharing experiences, living the good and the bad with those you’re determined to impact to communicate “you’re all in this together.”

 

Persuasion: Instead of giving orders and directing people in an inflexible hierarchy, servant leaders rely on persuasion. Dialogue is a critical component of persuasion. Servant leaders are engaging and share why something is a good idea for the team and how it’s benefits everyone.

 

Conceptualization: Servant leaders focus on the big picture and don’t get sidetracked by the muck of the daily grind. Although servant leaders have intimate knowledge of every aspect of their business, they delegate tasks to free themselves to remain focused on the better future that they see is coming.

 

Growth: Finally, servant leaders are passionate about personal and professional growth for each team member. They don’t believe they’re better than those who occupy a lower rung on the corporate ladder, and they believe that if they create the right culture, everyone is capable of doing exceptional work.

 

Servant leadership is a simple, powerful concept, and it starts with doing one thing to help another person improve his/her standing in the workplace – or in Schneidman’s example, on the streets.

 

“I think if we all do a little, we can help out a lot,” Schneidman said.

 

So take a moment and identify someone that you can help.

 

And do it today.

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3 Remarkable Things You Didn't Know About George Washington

Posted by Craig Huntington
Craig Huntington
Craig Huntington received his Bachelor of Science degree in business from Oregon
User is currently offline
on Sunday, 01 July 2018
in Blog

Most of us know the story about George Washington, who at the age of six, was given a new hatchet and proceeded to chop up everything in sight. This included his dad’s favorite, young, English cherry tree. When George’s father asked if he knew who had killed the tree, young George bravely fessed up.

 

You’ve probably also heard about Washington’s incredibly dramatic crossing of the Delaware River on Christmas night in 1776. His carefully prepared surprise attack on approximately 1400 Hessian soldiers (German mercenaries) in and around Trenton, New Jersey took place on an absolutely miserable night. Washington and his soldiers endured freezing temperatures and a Nor’easter that lashed them with sleet and snow as they crossed the ice-choked river. Then the troops marched 10 miles to Trenton to arrive for the successful pre-dawn attack. It was the first real military victory for the Colonial Army, which was in desperate need of one.

 

But what is more remarkable than Washington’s victory at Trenton is the fact that at least twice, he single-handedly saved the revolution. Following the battle at Trenton, many soldiers were ready to leave the army because their enlistments were up. They were done. They had experienced tremendous hardships, sacrificed for the colonies, and were prepared to return to civilian life.

 

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Remembering Those Who Survived

Posted by Craig Huntington
Craig Huntington
Craig Huntington received his Bachelor of Science degree in business from Oregon
User is currently offline
on Monday, 21 May 2018
in Blog

Back in the 1970’s a high school friend of mine told me a story that I’ll never forget. His father had asked him to go wake up his older brother, an Army veteran who had just returned home after serving a tour in Vietnam. This soldier was still asleep, and it was close to noon. The family wanted to have lunch with him.

 

My pal gingerly opened the door to his sibling’s bedroom. He walked quietly to the side of his sleeping brother and gently placed his hand on the young man’s shoulder to rouse him from what he assumed was a peaceful rest.

 

In the blink of an eye, my friend was lifted from the wooden floor and slammed against the wall that ran parallel to the bed. He heard a picture frame glass break as he became aware of an enormous pressure against his throat, where his brother’s hands were simultaneously choking him and pinning him to the wall.

 

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Unbelievable

Posted by Craig Huntington
Craig Huntington
Craig Huntington received his Bachelor of Science degree in business from Oregon
User is currently offline
on Sunday, 04 February 2018
in Blog

I first heard the phrase caveat emptor (Latin for “Let the buyer beware”) in a business class at Oregon State University many moons ago. For me, that principle was brought to life during my first excursion to purchase a used car.

 

I remember my salesman, with anxiety written all over his face, trudging back to his sales manager to see if there was any way possible that he could get an approval on the miserly offer that I had just extended. Of course, he wasn’t really talking to his sales manager when he walked away. He was trying to create the perception that I was beating him up on the sale price.

 

I just wanted to buy a decent car – not buy a lemon, polished up to look like a million bucks. And to accomplish that, I needed to haggle (or at least pretend to haggle) over a fair price. Buying a car was like a contest. The process was, and in many cases still is, a test of your negotiating skills and your moxie. A lot of people hated it. I actually loved it. I expected the salesman to try to take advantage of me, and my attitude was “give it your best shot.”

 

Fast forward to our enlightened, Internet age. Today product and pricing information is easily accessible online, and with consumer protections in place, much of the negotiating dance has disappeared. However, don’t get the idea that you can let your guard down – because the smarmy car sales guy has been replaced by the fake product review.

 

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UPCOMING EVENTS:

  

July 13 - Virginia Leadership Retreat - Risk: A Road Worth Traveling - Homestead Resort

July 19 - NACM - HOA Banking - Las Vegas, NV

August 2 - CAI Houston - Communications & Habits - Houston TX

October 13 - Risk: A Road Worth Traveling - Troy, MI

September 12 - Technology Security - Ft. Lauderdale, FL

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